Mothers demand an end to epilepsy drug ‘cover-up’

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Oct
2015
Thursday 29th
posted by Faye Lipson in Britain

Women tell doctors to warn patients of its pregnancy effects


MOTHERS who gave birth to disabled children cartier jewelry review
after taking a controversial epilepsy medication met MPs yesterday in a bid to expose a “huge cover-up” around the drug.

Campaigning group Infact wants to force doctors to tell their patients about the high-risk that sodium valproate — better known by brand name Epilim — poses to foetuses.

A huge 40 per cent of children born to mothers taking the drug have neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism.

And 11 per cent are born with major physical malformations such as spina bifida and heart and kidney problems.

Infact is also replica cartier urging Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt to launch an independent inquiry.

It has learnt that doctors were advised by the now defunct Committee on Safety of Medicines not to tell patients of the drug’s dangers when it was first issued for prescriptions in 1973.

This advice is no longer in force, although Infact alleges that most women prescribed the drug are still not being told of its risks.

Group co-founder Janet Williams told the Star: “So many kids have been harmed cartier bracelet
by this drug.

“We have got to make it mandatory for the doctors to tell ladies of the risks and give them that informed choice to make for themselves. At the moment, that is just not happening.”

Mother-of-two Catherine Cox, who provides educational support to children affected by foetal anticonvulsant syndrome (FACS), had a child with the condition while taking sodium valproate.

Her second child, born while she was taking a different anticonvulsant drug, does not have FACS.

“It’s been swept under the carpet all the way along,” said Ms Cox. “I asked very, very clear questions [before becoming pregnant] and was told that if my baby had cleft palate it would be unlucky, but they’d be able to sort it. And that was all I was told.”

Emma Murphy, who co-founded Infact with Ms Williams, has five children — all with FACS.

She warned that the drug was now being given out in high doses for conditions such as bipolar disorder.

“They know that it will harm the babies. Women should be told,” said Ms Murphy. “I went bracelet replica cartier through five pregnancies and was told nothing.”

Labour MP Teresa Pearce agreed at the meeting to collate personal stories from victims of Epilim and send them to Mr Hunt in order to put “evidence-based pressure” on him to launch an inquiry.

Cervical cancer: One-in-three women in Manchester are missing potentially life-saving smear test appointments

cervical-cancer-symptoms

Women in Manchester are being urged to ensure bracelets they have regular screening for cervical cancer as figures show almost one in three in the city are missing appointments.

Campaigners at the UK’s only dedicated cervical cancer charity have launched a huge awareness campaign aimed at boosting the figures.Watch movie online John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017)

It comes as experts have also called for the screening programme – known cartier bracelet
as the smear test – to be extended to over 64s.

National charity Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust has launched advertising on buses urging women to have regular tests.
It says those missing out are putting themselves at risk of developing skin cancer.

Robert Music, the charity’s chief executive, said: “The NHS cervical screening programme saves around 5,000 UK lives every year and yet one in three women in Manchester failed to attend screening last year.

“I had a letter asking me to come to a meeting with a consultant to discuss my results. That’s when cartier jewelry review
I knew something was wrong”
“It’s time that we see a shift in awareness of the importance of screening across women of all ages.”

Manchester was chosen as one of four cities for the campaign as figures show that screening uptake in the city is below average.

Across all age groups, 28.9pc failed to attend screening, compared with 22.2pc across England.

Numbers increased further among women in Manchester aged 50-64, with 29.4pc failing to attend.

The charity’s own report found that a lack of knowledge about the cause of the disease and who can be affected seems to be contributing to women aged 50 and 64 not attending screening.Watch movie online The Transporter Refueled (2015)

Screening is the most effective way of preventing cervical cancer and is offered to women aged 25 to 64 on the NHS.

Reality TV star Jade Goody’s battle with cervical cancer drew significant attention to the disease and there was a spike in women getting themselves tested following her death in 2009, but numbers have declined since.

Experts at the University of Keele have called for screening to be rolled out to women over 64 after their research cartier love bangle showed that 20 per cent of new cases fall in that age group – after which the screening programme currently ends.

Around half of cervical cancer deaths occur in women over 65.Watch movie online The Transporter Refueled (2015)

Sue Sherman, senior lecturer in psychology at Keele University, said: “Regular screenings have the potential to catch the disease early and reduce the victims of cervical cancer dramatically.”

Sarah Williams, Cancer Research UK’s health information manager, said; “We need to make sure that women are aware of the screening options available to them at different ages, and that barriers to taking part are addressed.”

Six-year-old boy told to ‘take off hearing aid to look smart for school photo’

Alfie Durant’s mother Kerri says he was left ’embarrassed and upset’ at being asked to take off the device

Alfie wearing his hearing aid (left) and without it in his school photo

Alfie wearing his hearing aid (left) and without it in his school photo Photo: Middlesborough Evening Gazette

A six-year-old boy was left “embarrassed and upset” when his school made him take off his hearing aid so he would look “smart” for his school photo.

Alfie Durant’s mother Kerri was puzzled when he refused for the first time to wear the device to school in case his classmates laughed at him.

But she realised why three days later when he brought his pictures home and she saw he had been photographed alongside cartier jewelry review
his little sister Scarlett, five, without the hearing aid, which sits behind his ear and is worn on a black band around his head.

When the school photographer arrived Alfie Durant was taken to the school office to have his hearing aid taken off at Middlesbrough’s Pallister Park Primary.


Alfie Durant’s hearing aid (Evening Gazette)

Mrs Durant immediately complained to the school saying her son, who has severe hearing loss in both ears, was being singled out because of his disability.

The school, ranked “outstanding” by Ofsted, has now apologised to Alfie’s mother and father, Robert, saying there was “no intent to cause bracelet replica cartier any offence by either any member of our staff or the photographer”.

Mrs Durant, 28, a restaurant supervisor, became suspicious that something was wrong when Alfie refused to put his hearing aid on the morning after the school photo shoot.

She said: “He said he was embarrassed to wear it in front of his classmates and he never had been before.

“Then when his pictures came he wasn’t wearing it in them and he told me the school told him to take it off for the photo so he would look smart.

“I phoned the school and spoke to the special educational needs officer who said they made a decision that I would want his aid off for the photograph.

“I feel my son has been discriminated against because of his disability and would like people to know how he is treated.

“Alfie suffers a lot with cartier love bangle his condition but he is such a brave lad. He should be accepted as he is.”


The school photograph (Evening Gazette)

Christine Wain, head teacher of Pallister Park Primary School, said: “Alfie is a beautiful little boy and takes a gorgeous picture whatever he is wearing, we have lovely photos of him on our website with his hearing aid on.

“The school photographic sessions saw our visiting photographer take 600 pictures over two days and we do our best to ensure that parents are pleased with the photos they receive.

“There was obviously no intention to cause any offence by either any member of our staff or the photographer, and we have already apologised to Alfie’s mum for any upset callingallcakes.org caused.

“Perhaps we could have taken one picture with and one without, but hindsight is a wonderful thing and we will be sure to keep Alfie’s hearing aid in place when next year’s pictures are taken and we can only apologise again.”

 

Vaccines….. Adverse Reactions Reported

A confidential GlaxoSmithKline document recently leaked to the press exposed that within a two-year period, a total of 36 infants died after receiving the 6-in-1 vaccine, Infanrix Hexa. [1] According to the website Initiative Citoyenne [2] who reported the news, the 1271 page document revealed that GlaxoSmithKline received a total of 1,742 reports of adverse reactions between October 23, 2009, and October 22, 2011, including 503 serious adverse reactions and 36 deaths. Initiative Citoyenne stated:

“It’s not that 14 deaths were recorded by GSK between October 2009 and end in October 2011 as we had originally calculated but 36 (14 from 2010 to 2011 and 22 from 2009 to 2010). In addition to these 36 deaths at least 37 other deaths (sudden death mainly), bringing the total to at least 73 deaths since the launch of the vaccine in 2000, and again, this concerns only the death by sudden death, no further recovery of under-reporting.”

Using the figure of 36 deaths over a two-year period, this averages 1.5 deaths per month, which by anyone’s standard is extremely high. Note that only 1 to 10% of adverse reactions to vaccines are actually reported. Therefore, in reality, the problem could potentially be far more serious and the actual of fatalities much higher.

THE DEADLY CHEMICAL COCKTAIL

The charts show that many of the babies who died passed away within the first few days of receiving the vaccine. [3] A total of three infants were reported to have died within hours of receiving the vaccine. This tragedy is hardly surprising given the vaccine’s ingredients listed on the GSK Infanrix Hexa product information , phentermine which parents are rarely given the chance to read prior to vaccination, including non-infectious substances from tetanus, diphtheria , purified proteins of pertussis bacteria, the surface protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBsAg, derived from genetically engineered yeast cells) and inactivated poliovirus. [4] Each 0.5mL dose contains:

  • diphtheria toxoid
  • tetanus toxoid
  • pertussis toxoid
  • filamentous haemagglutinin
  • pertactin
  • recombinant HBsAg protein
  • poliovirus Type 1
  • poliovirus Type 2
  • poliovirus Type 3
  • purified capsular polysaccharide of Hib covalently bound to tetanus toxoid
  • aluminium hydroxide
  • aluminium phosphate
  • 2-phenoxyethanol, lactose
  • Medium 199
  • neomycin
  • polymyxin
  • polysorbate 80
  • polysorbate 20
  • water

TOXIC DOSES OF TOXIC CHEMICALS

In an interesting article by Dr. Harold Buttram titled “The Ultimate : Do Childhood Vaccines Result in Genetic Hybridization from Alien Human and Animal DNA Contents?” he highlighted the problems associated with just two of these ingredients, including aluminum, which is a neurotoxin associated with Alzheimer’s disease and seizures, and formaldehyde, which is a known cancer-causing agent commonly used to embalm corpses. [5]

Dr. Harold Buttram also stated:

“It is universally recognized among toxicologists that combinations of toxic chemicals may bring increases in toxicity; that is, two toxic chemicals in combination will bring a ten-fold or even a hundred-fold increase in toxicity. 

A classical example of this principle was the Schubert study [21] in which it was found that the amount of lead and the amount of mercury, when each was given separately, would be lethal for one percent of rats tested, would become lethal for one hundred percent of rats tested when combined.

In vaccines this principle would apply at least to mercury and aluminum, both of which are potent neurotoxins.”live streaming movie Cars 3 online

CONCLUSION

Considering this information, is it any wonder that babies are dying after receiving vaccinations containing these ingredients? GlaxoSmithKline may try and hide the facts from us but they cannot hide them forever. Infanrix Hexa should be removed from the market immediately.

[contentbox headline=”References” type=”normal”]

  1. Confidential To Regulatory Authorities – Biological Clinical Safety and Pharmacovgilance – GlaxoSmithKline Research and Development Avenue Fleming 20 1300 Wavre Belgium
  2. Initiative Citoyenne
  3. Initiative Citoyenne Charts
  4. Infanrix Hexa product information leaflet
  5. Dr Harold Buttram The Ultimate Gamble: Do Childhood Vaccines Result in Genetic Hybridization from Alien Human and Animal DNA Contents?”

[/contentbox]

Mum who had swine flu jab while pregnant says it triggered narcolepsy, which makes her falls asleep EIGHT times a day… now she’s seeking up to £1million in damages

  • Heather McFarlane, from Glasgow, developed sleep disorder
  • The possible cause is linked back to the Pandemrix swine flu vaccine she received while pregnant in 2009 
  • The illness means she can no longer drive and has to take naps at work
  • Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline is close to settling with her

When an NHS letter advised a pregnant mum to get the swine flu jab to protect herself and her unborn child, she didn’t hesitate.

However, Heather McFarlane, 40, says the inoculation, given to her while she was pregnant in 2009, directly led to her developing the crippling sleep disorder narcolepsy.

The mum-of-three says the illness means that she now falls asleep up to eight times a day.

Heather McFarlane has spoken of the 'devastation' that the narcolepsy, which is believed to be linked to a swine flu jab administered to the mum-of-three while pregnant, has caused 

Heather McFarlane has spoken of the ‘devastation’ that the narcolepsy, which is believed to be linked to a swine flu jab administered to the mum-of-three while pregnant, has caused

Mrs McFarlane, a teacher from Glasgow, says that she is constantly exhausted and can nod off while doing the dishes, walking downstairs or just chatting to her three children. She can no longer drive and needs regular naps at work.

While pregnant with her third child, she was given the Pandemrix swine flu vaccine, in line with NHS advice for pregnant women.

She says her lawyers are now negotiating a possible £1million out-of-court settlement with drug makers GlaxoSmithKline.

Narcolepsy develops when the body’s immune system destroys neurons in a region of the brain known as the hypothalamus. Scientists are researching how Pandemrix triggers this.

Mrs McFarlane is angry that she’s missing her children growing up, as she says that she’s often asleep at key moments that most mums take for granted.

She said: ‘Narcolepsy has devastated my life. It sounds like most people’s idea of bliss being able to sleep all day, but it’s a living nightmare.’

An associated illness, cataplexy, means Mrs McFarlane can suffer episodes of paralysis. She says: 'I have been robbed of my life and my children denied their mum'  

An associated illness, cataplexy, means Mrs McFarlane can suffer episodes of paralysis. She says: ‘I have been robbed of my life and my children denied their mum’

She needs special sleep breaks at work and fears she’s missing out on the best years of her life.

Her lawyers have now told her she’s possibly due a £1 million compensation payout after apparently developing her narcolepsy in 嘉盛外汇 response to an injection she was given that was meant to prevent her from swine flu. The case is on the verge of being settled out of court.

At the time that she was inoculated, fears were rife that an epidemic was set to hit the UK. But she claims her life has been thrown into turmoil by the effects of the new drug.

She also suffers from catalepsy, a terrifying paralysis which means she can go into terrifying seizures in which she freezes, aware of everything going on around her, but unable to say or do anything.

Teacher Heather drops off while standing at the sink, talking to her kids or even while laughing – simple emotions such as sadness, anger or even laughter seem to pull some sort of trigger in her brain.

 ‘I would love to jump in the car and take the girls out for a mum-and-daughter shopping day, but I can’t.’I feel that pang of sadness and think how much they are missing out.’
 Heather McFarlane

Every aspect of her life, from walking down the stairs to the school run, is affected. She needs constant support from her mother and is terrified of the waking paralysis.

‘The cataplexy means I can be fully conscious yet terrifyingly paralysed and the narcolepsy makes me sleep. I drop plates, falling asleep while making dinner, and the children have caught them.

‘I have been robbed of my life and my children denied their mum.

‘I am too tired and asleep all the time.

‘Other mums spend time with their children. They have family days out, to concerts, museums, shows and the like.

‘I have to depend on my husband Kevin, mum Elly, sister Lorna and friends to help out all the time.’

Global pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline, the drug company which made the swine flu drug, has indicated it is willing to settle with 100 people in the UK and 800 worldwide.

They include midwives, doctors, nurses and pharmacists because front line health workers were urged to get the jab as their jobs with the public put them at risk.

A spokeswoman for GSK said the company was actively researching the possible association between Pandemrix and narcolepsy.

She said: ‘It includes the interaction this vaccine might have had with other risk factors in those affected.

‘The vaccination programmes against H1N1 pandemic flu were unprecedented in their scale and speed.

‘Because of this, GSK and governments agreed to manage and share the responsibility of answering any legal claims, by allocating between us the costs attributed to investigating and handling cases and any potential compensation if claims are found to have merit.

‘Throughout development of our H1N1 flu vaccines there was no data suggesting a potential for an increased risk of narcolepsy among those.

For Mrs McFarlane, the sudden-sleep syndrome has been hardest on Heather’s children – Molly, 14, Maisie, 11 and Dougie, five.

The McFarlane family (pictured from left, Maisie, 11, Heather, husband Kevin, Dougie, five and Molly, 14) have had their lives turned upside down by the sleep disorder and now rely heavily on help from Mrs McFarlane's mum to deal with everyday life

The McFarlane family (pictured from left, Maisie, 11, Heather, husband Kevin, Dougie, five and Molly, 14) have had their lives turned upside down by the sleep disorder and now rely heavily on help from Mrs McFarlane’s mum to deal with everyday life

‘I would love to jump in the car and take the girls out for a mum-and-daughter shopping day, but I can’t.

‘I feel that pang of sadness and think how much they are missing out.’

Despite constantly nodding off without warning, she says the condition leaves her feeling ‘totally exhausted’.

‘Narcolepsy wrecks your sleeping pattern and instead of being awake for hours it forces you to doze off several times a day, making you sleep less at bedtime,’ she explained. ‘It completely disrupts your sleep rhythm.’

The worst part of her ordeal has been the waking, locked-in paralysis she suffers.

‘I will laugh at TV programmes and then suddenly feel paralysed. It starts as a feeling spreading down my face.

‘I felt totally helpless and locked-in, unable to speak to communicate.

HEATHER’S DIARY: A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A NARCOLEPSY SUFFERER 

7am: After six hours’ sleep, induced by sleep drugs, she wakes and immediately takes more tablets to keep her awake.

They are essential to allow her to make the family’s breakfast and prepare her for her teaching job.

8am: Her mum drives the kids to school. She is no longer able to drive. She makes her way to work in a taxi.

8.45am: She arrives at her work prepared to stay awake for her pupils.

10.15am: At the staff break she crashes out in a quiet area with her mobile phone alarm set to wake her in 15 minutes.

12.15pm: Staff lunchtime allows her to get a chance to eat to try to recover weight lost through the drugs and exhaustion.

12.45pm: Heather lies down for another vital sleep with her mobile alarm set for 1pm. Before she was diagnosed and got vital drug treatment, she would fall asleep in front of pupils.

3pm: Pupils leave for home and Heather needs another 15-minute sleep before working on lessons for the following day.

4pm: Her taxi arrives to take her home. Most days she dozes in the back of the cab. The drivers are used to her and know to wake her when she gets home.

4.30pm: Back at home the kids are with her mum, Elly. They are busy with homework and Heather pitches in to ensure it is done. If she hasn’t slept well she’ll crash out on the couch for 30 minutes.

6pm: A key time when Heather can suddenly fall asleep without any notice. The children help out – ready to catch anything mum may drop.

6.30pm: The family are around the dinner table. Heather may slip off again into another sleep, sometimes even mid-conversation.

8-9pm: Her youngsters are preparing for bed and Heather checks lessons prepared for her pupils tomorrow.

11pm: Heather takes her nightly medication to help her sleep. Without it she would sleep for only two hours then wake through the night because of her wrecked sleep rhythm.

A normal day for Heather is punctuated by a series of sleeping sessions, some involuntary.

‘When it first happened my husband thought I had fallen asleep – but I wasn’t and couldn’t speak to tell him I was conscious. It’s horrible and frightening.

‘All this is because I followed NHS advice to be vaccinated for a swine flu epidemic.’

Mrs McFarlane, from Jordanhill, Glasgow, developed her condition after being given the Pandemrix swine flu vaccine, in step with NHS advice for pregnant women.

‘I received several letters telling me to get the jab – and I feared the outcome if I didn’t,’ she said.

‘They certainly didn’t tell me there hadn’t been enough long-term safety trials. I obviously wouldn’t have agreed if I had known that.’

The symptoms set in shortly after Dougie was born in 2010.

‘I struggled to stay awake but just put it down to being a busy mum,’ she said.

After months of worrying tests a specialist doctor at a Glasgow sleep clinic suggested her narcolepsy may be linked to the injection she was given.

She added: ‘After over a year of symptoms and desperate to find a cause my GP referred me to a neurologist to try and pinpoint the reason.

‘I was given a series of major tests, but nothing showed up. After all the tests and a sleep study at Gartnavel Hospital, I was referred to a sleep disorder consultant and the frightening truth emerged.

‘The specialist asked me immediately if I’d had the swine flu vaccine. He must have seen other patients with the same symptoms and here was another.

‘I was pleased to be diagnosed, but shocked to discover there is no cure.’

She now has to take a daily diet of strong drugs which have has caused her to lose a massive amount of weight – a stone-and-a-half in just five weeks at one point.

But it’s the lost time she can’t get back that leaves her feeling furious the most.

‘My kids are not getting the mum they deserve,’ she adds.

Lawyers have told the mum drug makers GlaxoSmithKline want to settle out of court.

As such she could be set for a seven-figure windfall. Her claim is one of 70 being handled by law firm, Hodge Jones & Allen. Two-thirds of the claimants are children.

The potential £100 million bill for claimants is being settled by the Government because of a deal health officials struck to cover serious side-effects.

Department of Health officials gave an indemnity to GSK covering all adverse reactions after GSK said it could not guarantee the drug’s safety because years of trials had not been conducted.

A Department of Health spokesperson said: ‘We understand how distressing narcolepsy can be.

‘Pandemrix was used to prevent serious illness and deaths during the swine flu pandemic in 2009/10.

‘At the time, the possible association with narcolepsy was not known.

‘We are working with the vaccine manufacturer and the claimants’ lawyers to consider the personal injury claims as quickly as possible.’

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Three women reveal the worrying truth about the new herbal diet pills that are for sale on the High Street

  • Pamela Horne, 40, suffered from crippling cramps and a distended stomach
  • Francesca Fonzarelli, 29, ended up in A&E after a panic attack
  • She was later diagnosed with Graves’ disease, an autoimmune condition
  • Lena Doherty was affected by dizziness and quickly gave up the pills 

Like most brides-to-be, Pamela Horne was keen to for her big day. She’d picked a figure-hugging dress and knew that if she slimmed to a trim size eight, it would look even better.

So in September 2013, with her wedding booked for the following August, the 40-year-old began searching for anything to help her lose weight. ‘I find it difficult as I have a sweet tooth,’ says Pamela, a manager for a chemical company, who lives in Northamptonshire with her husband Tony, 49, a company director, and her two children, aged 14 and 18.

‘I sit down all day at work and if there are biscuits, I find it impossible to resist. Then I found a supplement online called Skinny Fiber. There was lots of information about how it expanded in your stomach, so you felt less hungry, and there were positive reviews. It was described as a natural supplement containing plant extracts, which reassured me.’

Pamela Horne, 40 (pictured), was keen to lose weight for her wedding day and so began taking a supplement called Skinny Fiber which she had found online

Pamela Horne, 40 (pictured), was keen to lose weight for her wedding day and so began taking a supplement called Skinny Fiber which she had found online

These so-called appetite suppressants are the latest fad being pushed by the £2 billion diet industry — seen as a safer option to diet pills containing the banned chemical dinitrophenol, which have caused 60 deaths worldwide, including four in Britain.

Most appetite suppressants to slow digestion, thereby reducing cravings, but some also claim to ‘burn’ fat or speed up calorie expenditure.

Popular ingredients include garcinia cambogia and , a plant extract used by tribesmen in South Africa to help them survive without food while hunting in the desert.

And they’re available on the High Street. Health food shop Holland & Barrett sells garcinia cambogia pills for £19.99, while Boots sells £24.99 own-brand Appetite Control pills, containing a fibre that swells in the stomach.

But the consensus seems to be that appetite suppressants do not produce the sought-after results — and, even worse, that those bought from online suppliers could contain dangerous ingredients that could prove fatal.

In December, Cara Reynolds, 24, died after an overdose of Forza slimming pills she’d bought online. These ketones are compounds that give raspberries their smell and, in recent years, a flurry of ketone supplements have been launched following unproven claims they can prevent weight gain.

Pamela (pictured on her wedding day) did not consider the health risks that have been related to taking appetite suppressants and was encouraged by the thought of a quick fix

Pamela (pictured on her wedding day) did not consider the health risks that have been related to taking appetite suppressants and was encouraged by the thought of a quick fix

In a British Medical Journal article, Cara’s death was explained as a cardiac arrest due to the high dosage of caffeine in the pills. The author wrote: ‘Many slimming products have concentrations of up to 250 mg of caffeine per tablet, which is equivalent to more than four cans of Red Bull or seven cans of Coca-Cola.’

Although caffeine is usually safe, general advice is not to consume more than 400 mg per day (an espresso has around 200 mg). Very high levels of caffeine can have adverse effects on blood pressure and the heart.

Last year, the UK’s banned from sale unless they had been officially approved — though they can still be used in small quantities as a flavouring or extract. This allows companies such as Holland & Barrett to sell £19.99 pills marketed as raspberry ketones.

After two days of taking the supplements, Pamela (pictured on her wedding day) developed intense and crippling cramps and a distended stomach

After two days of taking the supplements, Pamela (pictured on her wedding day) developed intense and crippling cramps and a distended stomach

Meanwhile, full-strength raspberry ketones are readily available online.

For Pamela, though, any safety concerns were trumped by the lure of a quick fix. She sent off for a free, two-week trial of Skinny Fiber (it sells online for £40 for 120 pills) and followed the instructions, taking one or two a day with food.

But things quickly went wrong. In two days, she was struck by crippling cramps and a distended stomach. ‘The pains were agonising — really intense cramps,’ she says. ‘I was rushing to the toilet several times a day. My stomach became bloated and felt rock hard. I also had this terrible thirst, which wouldn’t go.’

Pamela's (pictured) husband, Tony, managed to persuade her to stop taking the pills and she felt better within a day 

Pamela’s (pictured) husband, Tony, managed to persuade her to stop taking the pills and she felt better within a day

Pamela hoped her symptoms would subside, and kept up the supplements for seven days. But she felt dreadful. ‘They did suppress my appetite — but only because I felt so unwell that I couldn’t eat much,’ she says.

Eventually, Tony urged her to stop taking them. Within a day, she began to feel better. ‘I felt really angry that something with such strong effects could be so easily available,’ she says.

We were unable to contact Skinny Fiber for comment. However, an independent distributor says: ‘I’ve had many satisfied customers who have lost weight while using the product. Results vary and are dependent on the person. This customer was experiencing the detox stage, which can be more extreme for some than others.’

Francesca Fonzarelli, 29 (pictured), struggled with her weight for years before deciding to try raspberry ketones which she found on eBay after the ban had come in

Francesca Fonzarelli, 29 (pictured), struggled with her weight for years before deciding to try raspberry ketones which she found on eBay after the ban had come in

He added it was possible Pamela bought her supplements from an unreliable vendor or website.

A major concern is these products are being bought online. Dr Colin Cable, of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, says: ‘If you go to a reputable High Street shop, you’ll have some kind of degree of safety.

‘The problem with online ones is that because they’re unregulated, you don’t know what you’re getting.’

Francesca is seen here in 2006 when she weighed 20 stone, she resolved to lose weight after her marriage broke down 

Francesca is seen here in 2006 when she weighed 20 stone, she resolved to lose weight after her marriage broke down

Tests on slimming supplements by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) have shown some contain illegal and harmful ingredients, including sibutramine — a slimming drug banned because it was shown to raise the risk of heart attacks penis enlargement pill and strokes. They also found phenytoin — an anti-seizure drug — and bumetanide — a diuretic — both of which could have serious effects on health. ‘If you were taking these, you could run into blood pressure problems or liver damage,’ says Dr Cable.

Francesca Fonzarelli, 29, a make-up artist and mother-of-two from Hertfordshire, decided to try raspberry ketones, which she had bought on eBay before the ban came in, after battling with her weight for years.

‘I left school a size 18. When I got married at age 20, I wore a size 24 wedding dress and was 21 st,’ she says.

When Francesca (pictured with her father) got married in 2006, age 20, she weighed 21 stone and wore a size 24 wedding dress

When Francesca (pictured with her father) got married in 2006, age 20, she weighed 21 stone and wore a size 24 wedding dress

When her marriage broke down four years later, Francesca resolved to lose weight. She tried various diets without success and, five years ago, turned to the ketones she’d bought on eBay.

She took a few a day and did lose 1½ st over three months, but also noticed worrying symptoms. She already suffered from heart palpitations, due to being overweight, but says that these increased after taking the pills.

Then, two months later, she suffered an acute episode.

Francesca (pictured with ex-husband, Mark) started taking a few ketones a day and lost 1½ st over three months but also suffered from increased heart palpitations

Francesca (pictured with ex-husband, Mark) started taking a few ketones a day and lost 1½ st over three months but also suffered from increased heart palpitations

‘I was watching TV and my heart started beating furiously,’ she says. ‘I couldn’t feel my fingers or catch my breath — I felt as if I was having a heart attack.’

Francesca was taken to A&E, where doctors said that she was having a panic attack. Three weeks later, the same thing happened again.

But this time, an electrocardiogram revealed an irregular heartbeat. She was referred to a cardiologist, who diagnosed her with Graves’ disease, an autoimmune disease causing overproduction of the thyroid hormone thyroxine, which can trigger a fast heart rate.

Francesca is seen here with her daughter Imogen, 8, in 2014. Francesca ended up in A&E and was diagnosed with Graves' disease 

Francesca is seen here with her daughter Imogen, 8, in 2014. Francesca ended up in A&E and was diagnosed with Graves’ disease

‘I realised I had no idea what I had been taking,’ says Francesca. One theory is that slimming supplements could be linked to Graves’ disease because they have an effect on the thyroid, but this has not been proven conclusively.

Francesca has since lost 6 st through diet and exercise and is a size 12. But she still suffers symptoms from Graves’ disease and needs daily medication. ‘I’m permanently cold, my immune system is weak and I get palpitations — I have to be careful with strenuous exercise,’ she says.

‘I’m going to be this way for the rest of my life. When you’re overweight you feel ashamed, so it is tempting to stay at home and try to find a solution online. These firms exploit that sense of shame.’

Francesca (pictured) has since lost 6 st through diet and exercise and is a size 12 but will suffer from the symptoms of Graves' disease for the rest of her life 

Francesca (pictured) has since lost 6 st through diet and exercise and is a size 12 but will suffer from the symptoms of Graves’ disease for the rest of her life

An eBay spokesman says: ‘We work closely with the MHRA, who advise us of items that are prohibited for sale online or require a prescription. All sellers are required to abide by our site rules or face penalties.’

Lena Doherty resorted to slimming pills after struggling to lose weight after having children. ‘I’m 13 st — I’d love to lose 4 st, as I’m only 5 ft 2 in,’ says Lena, 38, an office worker who lives with her husband and five children in Merseyside.

She was browsing for dietary aids in Holland & Barrett when an assistant suggested she try garcinia cambogia extract — said to suppress appetite. ‘There was lots about the supplement online, so I thought it was worth a shot,’ says Lena.

Lena Doherty (pictured) resorted to slimming pills after struggling to lose weight after having children

Lena Doherty (pictured) resorted to slimming pills after struggling to lose weight after having children

But within hours of taking her first capsule, she began to feel dizzy and her heart started to race.

‘I thought the wobbliness I’d felt was because my body wasn’t used to it, so I decided to keep taking them,’ she says.

The dizziness passed and, over three weeks, Lena lost 5 lb — but after consulting a nurse friend, she decided to stop.

Lena, pictured with husband, Wayne and children Jack and Emily, started using garcinia cambogia extract which is said to suppress appetite

Lena, pictured with husband, Wayne and children Jack and Emily, started using garcinia cambogia extract which is said to suppress appetite

A spokesman for Holland & Barrett says: ‘We recommend that customers check with their GP before embarking on weight loss and use food supplements only as part of a sensible diet and exercise plan.

‘Garcinia cambogia is a natural food supplement, which may support individual weight loss goals until better habits are established.

‘Research shows garcinia cambogia is well tolerated with few side-effects. However, as with any product, allergic reactions are possible. Customers should consult their GP if they are on medication or unsure about individual suitability.’

Lena, pictured with her family, suffered from dizziness initially and lost 5 lb in three weeks but decided to stop taking the suppressants after advice from a friend who is a nurse

Lena, pictured with her family, suffered from dizziness initially and lost 5 lb in three weeks but decided to stop taking the suppressants after advice from a friend who is a nurse

With nearly two-thirds of men and women obese or overweight, the notion of a miracle remedy to shed pounds is alluring.

According to experts, the only proven effective weight-loss drug licensed for UK use is orlistat, sold as Xenical or Alli.

The reality is that the best way to lose weight is by eating less and exercising. Pamela Horne did manage to lose a stone for her wedding — thanks to an old-fashioned method.

‘The thing that worked for me was walking and cutting sugar,’ she says. ‘Lots of women want a

Read more:

Women on Pill three times more likely to get Crohn’s disease… and the risk could be even higher with morning-after contraception

  • Cases of Crohn’s disease within the UK have exploded since the 1960s
  • Researchers believe use of the Pill may be a major reasons behind rise
  • Found sex hormones weakenz  gut creating perfect conditions for Crohn’s
  • Pill triples risk while ‘morning-after pill’ may make women even more prone
Doctors warned that taking the contraceptive Pill triples the risk of developing an incurable disease of the digestive system

Doctors warned that taking the contraceptive Pill triples the risk of developing an incurable disease of the digestive system

Taking the contraceptive Pill triples the risk of developing an incurable disease of the digestive system, doctors warned last night.

Cases of Crohn’s disease have exploded since the 1960s, and researchers now believe widespread use of the Pill may be one of the main reasons behind the dramatic rise. They have found sex hormones in contraceptive Pills can weaken the gut, creating the perfect conditions for Crohn’s to develop.

The doctors also fear that repeated use of the ‘morning-after pill’ – which contains even higher doses of sex hormones than the daily tablet – might make women still more prone to it.

Crohn’s involves the painful inflammation of the digestive system, most commonly the intestines. This makes digesting food difficult, resulting in diarrhoea, fatigue and anaemia. Flare-ups can be so bad that working is impossible, leading to lengthy periods off work.

Drugs and surgery can help ease symptoms, but there is no cure, and some sufferers find it so intolerable that they commit suicide. At least two Britons with Crohn’s have travelled to Switzerland to end their lives at the controversial Dignitas clinic.

Dr Hamed Khalili, a Harvard gastroenterologist, said Crohn’s cases had risen ‘two or three-fold’ in the past 50 years, since widespread use of the Pill began. It now affects an estimated 100,000 people in Britain – one in every 650 people – although only a fraction of these are officially diagnosed. Changing diets had been touted as a reason for the increase, but Dr Khalili said research into the suspected link had been ‘fairly disappointing’.

However, a study of 230,000 American women led by Dr Khalili found the risk was three times higher in women who had used the Pill for five years or more than those who had never been on it. A British study came to a similar conclusion.

Exactly why the Pill – taken by around 3.5 million women in Britain, a third of those of childbearing age – seems to raise the risk of Crohn’s remains unclear.

But Dr Khalili said changing a woman’s natural sex hormone levels appeared to do three things that could put them at greater risk: it made the gut lining more permeable, reduced levels of ‘friendly’ bacteria in the intestines and affected the immune system.

NHS video explains the symptoms of Crohn’s Disease

He added he would expect the morning-after pill to increase the risk further, because it contained higher levels of hormones but said there was no hard data yet to back up that hypothesis.

Overall, adult women are only a little more likely to have Crohn’s than adult men. But twice as many women as men suffer from one of the main forms of Crohn’s, where the colon is affected.

Dr Khalili, who practises at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, stressed a woman was unlikely to get Crohn’s simply by using the Pill, and that genetics played a large role. He said: ‘What’s very clear is that Crohn’s is not caused by oral contraceptive use by itself. It’s a combination of oral contraceptive use among individuals with a strong genetic predisposition to Crohn’s.

‘It’s an interaction between these two that significantly increases the risk of an individual developing it.’

Cases of Crohn’s disease have exploded since the 1960s, and researchers now believe widespread use of the Pill may be one of the main reasons behind the dramatic rise

Cases of Crohn’s disease have exploded since the 1960s, and researchers now believe widespread use of the Pill may be one of the main reasons behind the dramatic rise

It was ‘not far-fetched’ to imagine that women will soon be warned not to go on the Pill if they carry certain high-risk genes, he said.

Dr Khalili and his colleagues are now looking at this in a study of 1,500 women, a third of whom have Crohn’s.

Dr Simon Anderson, a consultant gastroenterologist at London Bridge hospital, said the Pill appeared to act as a ‘trigger’ to developing Crohn’s. He cautioned: ‘If you have a family history of Crohn’s, I would advise against starting on the Pill.’

But he said those without such a family history should not be unduly concerned. ‘You are tripling the risk, but from a low base,’ he explained. ‘Crohn’s is not a particularly common disease.’

A LIFE-LONG CONDITION WITH NO CURE: CROHN’S DISEASE

Crohn’s disease is a painful condition that causes inflammation of the digestive system.

Around one in 10,000 people are diagnosed every year with 115,000 current sufferers in the UK.

Crohn’s disease is one of the two main forms of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).The other common form of IBD is Ulcerative Colitis.

It is described as chronic, meaning it is a life-long condition, and can cause redness, swelling and pain.

Sufferers will have periods of good health, remission, as well as times when their symptoms flare up or relapse.

There is currently no cure for the disease, but drugs and surgery can give patients long periods of relief from their symptoms.

Last year a bikini selfie of Crohn's disease sufferer and aspiring model Bethany Townsend, pictured with two of her colostomy bags visible went viral

Last year a bikini selfie of Crohn’s disease sufferer and aspiring model Bethany Townsend, pictured with two of her colostomy bags visible went viral

The cause of Crohn’s disease is not well understood. Experts believe the condition is, in part, inherited, while an abnormal reaction of the immune system to certain bacteria in the intestines is thought to contribute.

Viruses, bacteria, diet, smoking and stress have all been suggested as environmental triggers, but there is no definitive evidence that any one of these is a cause of Crohn’s.

Crohn’s causes ulcers to form in the gut and inflammation that affects the body’s ability to digest food, absorb nutrients and eliminate waste in a healthy way.

Symptoms include:

  • Abdominal pain and diarrhoea

  • Tiredness and fatigue

  • Feeling generally unwell

  • Mouth ulcers

  • Loss of appetite and weight loss

  • Anaemia – a reduced level of red blood cells

The disease can cause complications including perforations. They happen when a severe blockage ruptures the bowel, making a hole. The contents of the bowel can leak through and form an abscess. It causes pain and a fever

Junk food and antibiotics are have also been blamed by doctors for the rise in the number of young people developing a serious digestive disorder.

Crohn’s has a number of high-profile sufferers including Towie’s Sam Faiers who was rushed to hospital in 2013 while she was a contestant on Celebrity Big Brother suffering ‘agonising cramps’. Shortly after the show she was diagnosed with the disease.

Last year a bikini selfie of Crohn’s disease sufferer and aspiring model Bethany Townsend, pictured with two of her colostomy bags visible went viral. The picture was part of a larger movement among those living with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis to put real faces on their illnesses and raise awareness

Sam Faiers describes the symptoms of Crohn’s disease

towie

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2995279/Women-Pill-three-times-likely-Crohn-s-disease-risk-higher-morning-contraception.html#ixzz3USJKpUIfWatch Froning The Fittest Man In History (2015) Full Movie Online Streaming Online and Download

Strength in Numbers

This week the medication Primodos and the ongoing battle for all its victims hit the film The Discovery streaming

Primodos was a hormone-based  used in the 1960s and 1970s that consisted of two pills that contained  (as acetate) and . It detected pregnancy by inducing  in women who were not pregnant. The presence or absence of menstrual bleeding was then used to determine whether the user was pregnant.

First made available for sale in the UK in 1959, it was withdrawn from sale in the UK in 1978streaming film Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

It was banned in 1978 as it was proving to cause birth defects on the babies.

We are now collaborating with lead campaigner Mary Lyons and her husband Mike (who like ourselves only nationally established themselves 2 years ago) have now successfully secured an independent panel by the Government to go into detail about the failings yet again of Medicines Healthcare Regulatory Agency/Government.

 

Successful campaigns are a good voice for all their victims. It entails total 100% dedication, a good work ethic, and most importantly support from all the families penis enlargement medicine involved.  Having met both Mike and Mary on a number of occasions, they will achieve everything they have set out to do, and we are looking forward to our future work together.

 

 

Did the swine flu jab give little Mathilda a crippling sleep disorder?

  • Mathilda is the youngest known person in the world to be diagnosed with narcolepsy
  • Her mother Claire believed she was protecting her when she had Mathilda vaccinated against swine flu
  • Mathilda began receiving Xyrem, a drug that helps with symptoms of narcolepsy 
Bubbly: But Mathilda soon developed narcolepsy, suffering from terrifying nocturnal hallucinations and excruciating pain

Bubbly: But Mathilda soon developed narcolepsy, suffering from terrifying nocturnal hallucinations and excruciating pain

When Claire Crisp agreed to have her three-year-old daughter Mathilda vaccinated against swine flu, she believed she was doing the best to protect her from a life-threatening pandemic.

In 2009, all children under five were invited to be vaccinated in a nationwide scheme.

Fortunately, the much-feared 2009-2010 outbreak never reached the pandemic scale expected. But Claire is convinced that the vaccine against it has left Mathilda with severe narcolepsy.

Mathilda is the youngest known person in the world to be diagnosed with the neurological condition, which causes sufferers to suddenly fall asleep during the day. Mathilda also had terrifying nocturnal hallucinations and excruciating pain.Now she is part of a protracted legal battle against the Government for compensation for vaccine-related narcolepsy. Last week, their case went to court on appeal.

This wrangling has continued despite the fact the Government’s scientists admitted two years ago that the vaccine, Pandemrix, could cause narcolepsy, having previously denied any link. In a statistical investigation, published in the British Medical Journal, they found children given the vaccine were 14 times more likely to have developed narcolepsy than unvaccinated children.

Claire, 44, a former NHS physiotherapist, thought she was playing safe when she had Mathilda vaccinated. Doctors had suggested her daughter could be at particular risk from respiratory trouble from swine flu because she was born with a minor throat condition, laryngomalacia, which obstructs breathing. Children normally grow out of it by three.

‘We took the swine flu risk seriously since Mathilda had only recently outgrown laryngomalacia,’ says Claire, who also has a son, Elliot, and another daughter, Liberty.

NHS clinics administered more than 900,000 doses of Pandemrix in 2009 and 2010. Mathilda’s first troubling symptoms developed within two weeks. Her sleep became disturbed, leaving her exhausted in the day. Then she began to suffer from hallucinations at night, thinking there were demons in her bedroom.

‘The symptoms just got worse — she wasn’t sleeping at night, and sleeping and crying all day,’ says Claire. ‘Nearly every time I turned round in the day, she was asleep.

‘She was slurring her words. She could not walk in a straight line, she suffered excruciating leg pains. She also became incontinent.’

Then she developed cataplexy, where she’d become temporarily paralysed for seconds by emotional triggers such as happiness or surprise, though staying conscious.

‘Her brother would say a joke and she would fall down,’ says Claire.

Within six months, Claire and her husband Oliver, a professor of theology, were housebound caring for Mathilda. She was taken to a children’s hospital for what Claire calls ‘a series of failed visits’.

Initially, doctors thought she had a brain tumour, but after tests they ruled that out. ‘The doctors quickly wrote us off as an anxious mother and a pain-in-the-a*** child.’

The family was being referred to a psychiatric unit when a locum doctor from India diagnosed narcolepsy, which normally appears at around the age of 15.

Doctors had suggested to Claire her daughter could be at risk from respiratory trouble from swine flu because she was born with a minor throat condition

Doctors had suggested to Claire her daughter could be at risk from respiratory trouble from swine flu because she was born with a minor throat condition

Claire spoke to a friend’s cousin, who has narcolepsy. ‘They warned me that we probably wouldn’t get any help for it in Europe, but said Stanford University in California had the world’s best expertise. I got in touch with them.’

Based on blood samples sent by post, experts at the university confirmed the diagnosis.

The acknowledged world expert in the condition, Dr Emmanuel Mignot, is the director of the university’s Centre for Sleep Sciences and Medicine.

He is recognised for finding the cause of narcolepsy — the failure of special ‘wakefulness’ cells, called hypocretins, found in the brain’s sleep centre.

Dr Mignot has also identified a possible reason why the vaccine has caused narcolepsy: a part of the swine flu virus is similar to a part of the hypocretin cell.

The Pandemrix vaccine primes the immune system’s ‘killer’ cells to attack this part of the swine flu virus. But in a minority of patients, the killer cells also mistakenly attack the hypocretin cells, thinking they are swine flu cells. The risk is confined to people with a susceptible genetic make-up, Dr Mignot wrote in the journal Science Translational Medicine in 2013 — with around 20 per cent of the European population having this gene profile. However, he’s had to retract this article because the data could not be reproduced.

But Dr Mignot believes another possible link is adjuvants in the vaccine. These chemicals stimulate the immune system to produce a more powerful reaction to the inactive virus in the vaccine. In the U.S., swine flu vaccines have not used adjuvants nor have they been linked with narcolepsy. Dr Mignot says: ‘My opinion is that it was a combination of the adjuvants and the H1N1 [swine flu] virus particles in Pandemrix that made it very nasty for narcolepsy.’

GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), the pharmaceutical company which made the vaccine, says 795 people across Europe have reported developing narcolepsy since its use began in 2009. Convinced their daughter needed to be under Dr Mignot’s care — who would provide the expensive drug therapy she needed for free — the family moved to California four years ago.

Experts at Stanford University in California confirmed Mathilda's diagnosis

Experts at Stanford University in California confirmed Mathilda’s diagnosis

Mathilda began receiving Xyrem, a drug that helps with symptoms of narcolepsy, possibly by affecting chemical messengers in the brain.

‘A course of Xyrem costs £12,000 a year,’ says Claire. ‘Some children in Britain receive it, depending on a postcode lottery. It was not available to us in Bristol.’

The drug treatment has been ‘life-changing,’ she says. Mathilda sleeps restfully at night for three hours at a time. Rarely does she experience hallucinations. Her sleep in the day is condensed to two naps, she no longer collapses when she is happy nor does she slur or wobble when walking.

While the Government acknowledges Pandemrix can cause narcolepsy, it has decided the condition doesn’t make people more than 60 per cent disabled, which is the threshold for compensation for any jab under the Vaccine Damage Payment Scheme run by the Department for Work and Pensions.

The scheme was set up to provide a clear, non-adversarial way of compensating people for damage from mass vaccination campaigns, meaning the government, not the manufacturer, ultimately foots the bill. A spokesman says: ‘Decisions on claims take into account the individual circumstances of each case and the latest available medical evidence. To date, no payment has been made in respect of immunisation against swine flu.’

Claire Crisp says this attitude is born out of ignorance: ‘The condition has destroyed about 70 million neurons within Mathilda’s brain’s sleep centre.’

Over the past four years, the scheme has not paid out anything. However, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) says that between 2009 and 2014, it received 191 reports of the Pandemrix vaccine allegedly causing narcolepsy and related conditions.

Likewise, no payouts have been made to young girls who have apparently suffered damage from the HPV vaccine campaign against cervical cancer — despite the fact that, according to the MHRA, more than 300 schoolgirls a year are reporting serious side effects.

Claire’s lawyers, Hodge Jones & Allen, have 68 people in a narcolepsy class action — two-thirds were children when vaccinated. Lawyer Peter Todd has been pursuing the cases with the Vaccines Damage Payment Scheme. ‘The Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) initially refused our application because it would not accept there was a link between Pandemrix and narcolepsy,’ he says.

This was before the publication of the BMJ study. ‘Now they are saying narcolepsy is not a severe disability and does not qualify for compensation.’

Mathilda's drug treatment has been 'life-changing' and she sleeps restfully at night for three hours at a time

Mathilda’s drug treatment has been ‘life-changing’ and she sleeps restfully at night for three hours at a time

After a court ruled that the patients could be compensated, a DWP appeal reversed this. Last week Mr Todd took an appeal against this ruling to a higher tribunal. He is also pursuing GSK on the grounds not of negligence, but under consumer protection law that the product wasn’t as safe as consumers could expect.

Claire stresses she is not anti-vaccine. ‘The problem is how the Government is dealing with the consequences of Pandemrix.’

This is echoed by Matt O’Neil of the charity Narcolepsy UK.

‘Vaccination campaigns only work if sufficient people volunteer for them,’ he says. ‘Anyone who suffers damage from doing something for the good of society should surely be looked after by society.’

A GSK spokesman told us: ‘While those vaccinated with Pandemrix have been shown in several published studies to be more likely to develop narcolepsy than those who were not, further research is needed to confirm what role the vaccine may have played in the development of narcolepsy among those affected.

‘Pandemrix went through a rigorous approval process . . . throughout the development of our pandemic vaccines there were no data to suggest a potential for an increased risk of narcolepsy among those vaccinated.

‘We continue to support ongoing work from other experts and organisations investigating reported cases of this condition.’

The universal use of Pandemrix in those aged under 20 was stopped in Britain in 2011.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2987209/Did-swine-flu-jab-little-Mathilda-crippling-sleep-disorder.html#ixzz3TyJjGOCMWatch movie online The Transporter Refueled (2015)

Epileptic man forced to sleep on hospital floor for four WEEKS while waiting for a brain scan he’s still not had

  • Michael Collins hit his head during a fit and was admitted to hospital
  • He started behaving violently so had his bed taken away and replaced with a mattress on the floor
  • Mr Collins, 54, has now moved hospitals but is still waiting for MRI scan
  • In the meantime relatives have no explanation for his erratic behaviour

An epileptic hospital patient was forced to sleep on the floor for four weeks while he was waiting to have a scan on his brain.

Michael Collins was kept in a receiving ward, normally for short stays of no more than two days, after being admitted to the Royal Infirmary in Glasgow.

He hit his head during an epileptic seizure, making him prone to violent outbursts – so hospital staff removed his bed from the room and made him sleep on a mattress on the floor.

It took three weeks before Mr Collins, 54, was given a chair, and though he has now moved to another hospital he is still waiting for an MRI scan six weeks after the accident.

Hospital: Michael Collins had to spend four weeks in a room without a bed while waiting for a scan

Hospital: Michael Collins had to spend four weeks in a room without a bed while waiting for a scan

Relatives of the former roofer, from Glasgow, are desperate to find out what is wrong with him, but until he has the scan – which will take around 45 minutes – they are still in the dark.

His partner Suzanne Brown, 50, said: ‘We took him to A&E at the Royal and he was kept in overnight.

‘He had another fit the next morning so they kept him in for another few days. But a couple of days later he walked out of the hospital at 3.30am.

‘He threw all his medication away and walked out dressed only in his slippers, pyjamas and housecoat.

‘Clearly, mentally he was not right. Before he banged his head he was fine. He had no mental health issues whatsoever.’

Precaution: Mr Collins had to sleep on a mattress on the floor after he behaved violently

Precaution: Mr Collins had to sleep on a mattress on the floor after he behaved violently

Waiting: He did not even get a chair in the room for his first three weeks in hospital

Waiting: He did not even get a chair in the room for his first three weeks in hospital

Ms Brown initially took Mr Collins to the GP after he hit his head, and was then referred to A&E.

‘We waited seven hours in casualty,’ she said. ‘Then he was put in a receiving ward. You are supposed to be there for a maximum of two days.

‘He was supposed to be going to the Southern to get an MRI scan and a lumbar puncture but they cancelled his appointments three times.

‘They’re sedating him because of his outburst in the waiting room but he’s not that kind of man. It’s terrible to see him like this.

‘I know there is something wrong with his brain. If they would just give him the scan we could find out what is the matter with him.

‘I thought they would at least have given him a bed with cot sides so he couldn’t get out or do himself an injury.

A&E: Mr Collins spent four weeks at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, pictured, before moving to another hospital

A&E: Mr Collins spent four weeks at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, pictured, before moving to another hospital

‘When he went in at first he was quite violent, throwing things about, so they took everything out of his room.

‘He keeps going back to when he was a boy and still thinks his mum and dad are alive.’

Ms Brown praised the way doctors and nurses looked after Mr Collins before he was moved to the Southern General Hospital, but criticised the NHS for failing to treat him promptly.

A spokesman for NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde said: ‘The patient presented with extremely challenging behaviour and for his own protection and personal safety had to be nursed with only a mattress in his room.

‘We accept there were delays in transferring him to the Southern General. We also accept a delay in providing the appropriate tests which need to be undertaken with specialist clinical input.

‘These have now been arranged to be undertaken this week.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2986636/Epileptic-man-forced-sleep-hospital-floor-four-weeks.html#ixzz3Tvf5o7s9Watch movie online The Transporter Refueled (2015)